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Legacies in Intellectual History

Legacies in Intellectual History

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Date(s) - 04/19/2021
9:00 am - 1:00 pm

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Monday, April 19, 2021, from 9:00 am to 1:00 pm CDT.

Legacies in Intellectual History

About this Event

The perceived need to understand the reception and dissemination of authors and their texts has been with us for some time. However, a sense of the importance of circulation and legacies has increased in recent years, with a number of authors examining the invention and reinvention of established authors, themes and traditions. This type of intellectual history investigates the ways in which ideas are read and discussed, taught and learnt, adulterated and appropriated. Examining the historical construction and usages of texts and authors—and why some ideas and texts become and remain powerful, while others do not—is one of many ways in which we can identify how the contributions of lesser-known figures (and the times they lived in) play formative roles in intellectual history. This symposium considers the ways taking historical ‘legacies’ seriously allows us to return to well-worn topics with fresh queries, or to ask altogether new questions about the ways in which ideas, concepts and traditions are developed and transformed across time and space.

Panel 1: Thinkers (3pm-4.45pm)

Claire Rydell Arcenas (Montana) – ‘The Problem of the Thinker-Adjective in Intellectual History.’

Waseem Yaqoob (QMUL) – ‘An inheritance with no testament: reading Hannah Arendt from Cold War to Arab Spring’

Julia Nicholls (KCL) – ‘Marx and Marxism in Modern France’

Comment: Sean Irving (Essex)

Panel 2: Themes (5.15pm-7pm)

David Craig (Durham) – ‘Republicanism vs Liberalism: Origins of an Historiographical Debate’

Peter Sloman (Cambridge) – ‘Can we write the history of basic income?’

Ben Jackson (Oxford) – ‘Intellectual Histories of Neoliberalism and their Limits’

Comment: Glory Liu (Harvard)

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